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Author Topic: How to Stand Out on Social Media  (Read 1403 times)

Nick

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How to Stand Out on Social Media
« on: September 15, 2014, 06:14:40 PM »

HOW TO STAND OUT IN THE MUSIC GAME - By Nick Fletcher

There's nothing wrong with the state of social media today! It can feel like you're swimming in a sea of similar fish, but that's because we've been caught with our pants down.
The majority of us music makers are not thinking outside the box enough, and we seem to just be settling with the most obvious and easiest ways of using this new technology. There are some obvious flaws in the common ways most musicians go about their business these days, IMHO, and I'll outline them below:

1. Posting in musicians forums and gig guides about your upcoming gigs and musical releases is probably a waste of your time. Not a lot of excitement can be expected from telling your competition that you're competing with them! Just because there's thousands of members in a group on Facebook, doesn't mean they're looking to discover new music. They're most likely only thinking what the group can do for their own music.

2. Social media is great, but it's not the only way to do things! Forums haven't died out yet and it's not that difficult to build your own website (if I can do it, YOU can!). Find somewhere that isn't a concentration of musicians and start a discussion about your music there. You can also stream live performances to anywhere in the world for free these days.

3. Venues are first and foremost a business and whilst they may support original music, they need to keep the lights on through patrons buying beer. They try to do this by getting live music, usually before (and in place of) they have put the effort into promoting and developing their business like most other businesses do. So you're always going to struggle with venues like this. The venues that have their shit together will be so successful that they won't want or need to deal with small time acts. So make your own shows. Organise a hall and enough fellow musicians and make it happen. At least there'll be less drunks!

4. Everyone can make music on their computer these days. That's a good thing for people who want to make music, but it doesn't always lead to the most compelling productions. I hear a lot of preset magic plugins and poor arranging on many home made productions and these things STAND OUT to listeners, but they wouldn't necessarily be able to tell what is standing out. Also, a lot of productions are a one person show and that person is too close to the production to be subjective on their decisions. There have not been many truly great records written, pre-produced, produced/tracked, mixed and mastered solely by one person. I'm happy to help in this regard, just ask.

So I say continue to think outside the box and do things to put your music above the pack. I've always thought of the status quo as a good thing. Without it, we would have a much tougher time standing out.
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